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    CCR's Sequencing Facility

  • Site Image

    CCR's Sequencing Facility

CCR Sequencing Facility

Advanced Technology Research Facility
8560 Progress Drive
Lab D3040
Frederick, MD 21701

 

Mission:

The mission of the Center for Cancer Research Sequencing Facility (CCR-SF) is to utilize high-throughput sequencing technologies to enrich cancer research and ensure that the NCI community can leverage the leading-edge of Next-Generation Sequencing technology.

Submit a Sequencing Facility Request

CCR Sequencing Facility: Overview

The introduction of DNA sequencing instruments capable of producing millions of DNA sequence reads in a single run has profoundly altered the landscape of genetics and cancer biology. Complex questions can now be answered at previously unthinkable speeds and a fraction of their former cost. At the Sequencing Facility, NCI researchers are provided access to the latest technologies, with consultation and Q&A services available throughout the design and execution of sequencing projects. Please click here for more detailed information on sequencing applications and supported projects.

Our lab currently employs the following sequencing platforms:

 

NovaSeq6000

Illumina (Short Read) Sequencing Technology

  • Illumina sequencing utilizes reversible terminator chemistry optimized to achieve high levels of cost effectiveness and throughput
  • Millions of reads produced per sample lane at 50 bp to 300 bp read lengths
  • Support for the multiplexing of 96 barcoded samples into a single lane
  • Available resources include one NovaSeq6000three NextSeq500, one HiSeq4000, and one MiSeq sequencers

PacBio Sequel

Oxford Nanopore

Bionano Irys

Long-Read Sequencing and Mapping Techonologies

PacBio Sequel Sequencing

  • Sequencing via single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) technology enables rapid identification of long nucleotide chains, with average yields 10 – 20 Gb per SMRT Cell (Detailed description)
  • Read lengths averaging greater than 20,000 bases per molecule, with maximum read lengths > 100,000 bases, facilitate genome assembly and mapping of repetitive regions
  • Highly accurate circular consensus reads up to 10,000 base pairs
  • Amplification-free direct sequencing of individual molecules precludes PCR bias and artefacts
  • Low-input protocol developed by the Sequencing Facility enables sequencing of as little as 500 picograms of starting material for many applications
  • Minimal machine turnaround time provides flexibility in experimental and run design

Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinIon Sequencing

  • Sequencing via nanopore technology enables rapid identification of ultra-long reads, with average yields 0.5 – 10 Gb per flow cell, depending on which application is utilize (Detailed description)
  • Read lengths averaging greater than 100,000 bases per molecule, with maximum read lengths > 1,000,000 bases, facilitate genome assembly and mapping of repetitive regions
  • Amplification-free direct sequencing of individual DNA and RNA molecules precludes PCR bias and artefacts
  • Minimal machine turnaround time provides flexibility in experimental and run design

Bionano Genomics Irys Next-Generation Genome Mapping

  • Non-sequencing-based genome mapping technology images and analyzes extremely long, high-molecular-weight DNA molecules to create de novo genome assemblies and detect large structural variants (> 100kb) missed by long-read sequencing technologies (Detailed description)
  • Can be used to scaffold sequencing data with genome maps to assemble genomes with the greatest contiguity in correct order and orientation
  • Requires cellular input as the starting material for DNA extraction
10X Chromium

Single Cell Sequencing

  • The Chromium system from 10X Genomics uses the 10X Gemcode technology to provide comprehensive solutions for DNA and RNA analysis
  • Single cell 3’ mRNA-Seq provides gene expression profiles of thousands of individual cells
  • Single cell V(D)J solution profiles full-length paired V(D)J transcripts from thousands of cells

 

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